River Rother plasticblitz

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Join local environmental organisation Strandliners at a unique event along the Rother riverbanks.

Will we find Sacculum excrementum or Vapus intoxicatum?

What is a plasticblitz?
Just as a bioblitz is an event where people find and identify as many species as possible in a given area over a specific period of time. Scientists, families, students and community members work together to get a snapshot of the area’s biodiversity, a plasticblitz is an event bringing together members of a community to find, identify and record the plastic ‘species’ they find.

Thames21 (www.thames21.org.uk) has joined forces with the Environment Agency and Rotary International to call on community groups to take part in a clean-up and survey of plastic waste from rivers across the UK between the Saturday, May 27 to Sunday, June 11.

Environmental plastic pollution
Plastic pollution is a serious and growing problem within our rivers. Plastic waste threatens wildlife through ingestion and entanglement, and slowly breaks down into microplastics, which can work their way into the food chain.

Shockingly, once plastic enters our rivers, there is no statutory obligation for any organisation or public body to remove it. Up to 80% of plastic pollution found on our coastlines comes from inland sources, carried there by rivers and streams.

Plasticblitz along the river Rother
Previously focused on the river Thames and its tributaries, the plasticblitz is going UK-wide for the first time this year. Strandliners is leading events along the river Rover in the Rye area. Our surveys will allow us to compare the ‘litter DNA’ with previous surveys in the same area, and the data will feed into the ‘Preventing Plastic Pollution’ project.

Strandliners’ events are as follows:
Saturday, June 10 – Scots Float, Rye
Sunday, June 11 – Monk Bretton bridge, Rye

For more information, please email strandlinersevents@gmail.com or go to www.strandliners.org.

See Twitter feed @StrandlinersCIC for plastic tweets of the day

Image Credits: Andy Dinsdale .

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